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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
saying religion has to be crucial for education. can't separate these two so consequently our response is we need to have the readings of the catholic bible under the direction of priests in public-school score give us money to fund our own parochial schools so we can have an integrated religious education and neither side could actually see the merits of the other side in this debate. it was highly contentious and tore apart communities throughout the nineteenth century on how to resolve this issue. supreme court for standard this debate about school prayer in 1948 in a case dealing with relief time. relief time was actually an interesting modification to respond to complaints about school sponsored prayer and bible reading in public schools as a way of accommodating all groups from ministers in gary, indiana in the 20th century, let's not have the schools be responsible for religious education, let's put aside a time during the day, and allow each religious community to bring in teachers or ministers to the children of that faith. and religious education on site. and in the first par
? or--or religion--how--how can religion help to reinvigorate american democracy? or schools--what can the school--what role can schools play in--in trying to fix this problem? c-span: what is the status of religion? >> guest: religion is--as a whole, religious participation is down, as everything else is, in terms of social connections. down about, oh, 25 percent over the last--that is, take going to church, for example, is down by about 25 percent over the last 25, 30--30 years. but, obviously, there are some parts of the religious spectrum that have had ena--enormous growth during this period. and there are others that have had substantial falls. i mean, the mainline protestant churches, for example, and--and--and--and attendance at mass among catholics, has dropped off a lot. but that's t--partially offset by the growth and participation in evangelical communities. and what we were talking about in the saguaro seminar was, well, ok, su--suppose we were to have a--another one of these what people call great awakenings, which we've had periodically in american history, where people b
as the religion of the land. so this was a big occasion, the 10th anniversary. all the bishops were summoned and mussolini's own representatives would be there, the king's son would be there, the world would be watching. it was a speech that the the pope saw as his last opportunity to get out a crucial message, a dramatic message. if i can just. i don't know how to work this. one button which doesn't seem to do anything. i'm just going to show you a couple of images to illustrate this -- yeah, that's what we are trying to do. i don't want to keep you there. this is a, shows had been so robust. this is in his last 10 days or so of his life what he looked like. if you go to the next image, you see both as younger men, at the time they both came to power in 1922, which is the beginning of my story. benito mussolini is 39-year-old. a rabble-rouser, a bully, aficionado of violence. he would come to power by leading his, kind of ragtag troops in a march on rome and through kind of extortion come to power at the end of 1922, just a few months after the pope came to power. the dictator came to depen
's dealing with the difficult subject matter. it deals with religion and catholicism, and there are some criticisms, and people get touchy when you criticize their religion. you have to be careful. i knew if i could make people laugh people relax a little. they are not so scared about talking about difficult subjects. lex like i am the first woman you have ever fallen in love with? >> sure. and i wasn't your first love? >> of course not. >> i thought i was. stop it. it's dumb. how old are you? come on. >> 41. seen -- scene, it's about 14 minutes long. talk to me about the reason for doing that, why you think it works? that's a long opening scene, but it works. >> we rehearsed this take probably 21 days as a dialogue -- we are driving the car 20 miles of road that has to be blocked out with this crazy take. the kids are asleep in the car. when you are young you are always talking, and you are with the woman and she is with you and your philosophizing. what's going to happen as you get older? those moments of whimsy are hard to find. that was the germ that started the screenplay. where ar
the street. and fifa has religion covered. football'football for men and we now allowed to wear headgear. we have more coming newspaper sports. up in sport sports. >> in let's cross over to al jazeera live in islamabad. tell us what the reaction from the pakistani government has been under? >> well, as you mentioned the committee that was constituted by the government of pakistan to talk to the taliban pakistan committee has welcomed the move saying the talks that were deadlocked has now resumed since the taliban ha agreed to a cease-fire. the government made it clear that it would go for a policy of a quid pro quo meaning if it came under attack it would go after the headquarters. a dramati dramatic development y would now grow to the cease-fire. they said in a message sent to several news outlets including al jazeera. >> and as we're mentioning, there have been previous efforts of peace negotiations between the government and taliban, but is the taliban capable of enforcing a cease-fire on the ground? >> well, they have instructed the various groups to abide by the cease-fire. in fact, aft
shot dead. >> he lost his life for the sake of his country and the sake of his religion. the current rulers are to be blamed. >> reporter: in the last few weeks there have been strikes and protests by workers who want to be paid more. keeping a lid on these would be a challenge for the cabinet. once again there will be a new government in egypt. >> al jazeera continues to demand release of its staff held in egypt. they have now spent 63 days in prison. they are accused of having links to a terrorist organization and spreading false news. al jazeera rejects the charges. and another journalist from the al jazeera arabic has been held and has been on a hundre a hunge to protest his imprisonment. >>> joaquin guzman is considered a folk hero who gave them jobs. from northwestern mexico, how are people reacting to the news? >> reporter: well, we've seen some pretty strong reactions here over the past week since the arrest of el chapo. today, in fact, there is a demonstration being organized a march, i should say, being organized by a group said sin lowans for peace. thousands of people sho
. >>> arizona governor jan brewer was forced to veto legislation that would use religion to codify hate and deny basic rights. major corporations like american airlines, at&t, the nfl and mlb, in addition to business leaders throughout the state urged the governor to veto the bill. while similar measures have been introduced in about a dozen other republican-controlled states like kansas, south dakota and tennessee, by the end of the week, the moral and economic arguments seem to have had an impact. now this comes as we've seen a rapidly growing acceptance of lbgt americans and issues like same-sex marriage. a federal judge ordered kentucky to immediately begin recognizing same-sex marriages from other states. so that suggests to me that the reason for the proliferation of these hateful measures is fear. just like the anti-women's rights and anti-voting rights legislation we've seen in states, these measures represent fear of a changed reality. but the question now is whether or not the events of last week represent a final tipping point in ensuring equal rights for lbgt americans. let's bring i
that got picked on and get them out and the dog to lick and a bit about religion and media over the city of the building but up about that. the body of about but it ought to go to bed. they stopped. how did you form a dead end. both while but at the book which i compared latte. that is shovel one that got hit in the job of being a bit about the day. the body of the battle of the box but they never watch it. combine that with the title of the top and gave it to bed with each victim got a bad thing. papa but that these discrepancies but that the government will pay the bill forgot about that but they were. chiefs. it was sixteen. yes i know with this it is not confined to max's last thing i hate it. on the nineteenth the resistance to . he's been with them children on admit it ed. i have been that way. but the kitchen in my opinion an apprentice with us was that he will cover the back of a comeback. yet he said indigenous blood. the liver of them. like whatever but the rest of the capital room through chance to know. it is is it that a sneeze and sneeze. this means i am. but it's more to
of the law substantially burdenening somebody's exercise of religion. arizona is one of many that has laws like that. so what was different about this arizona law is that it would have expanded the law to apply not just to individuals but to businesss that get sued by someone in a private lawsuit, someone that they refuse to serve and what got the sponsors of the bill concerned was a decision last year in neighboring new mexico when the supreme court there ruled against a be queer key photographers who refused to photograph the ceremony of two women. and this is exactly at the heart of the challenge to the obamacare law that the supreme court will hear next month. >> gwen rattled off this week's different developments. you've got fights in state houses and in courthouses. what else is going on? >> a texas judge became the latest to strike down a ban on same sex marriage saying that it's -- there's no good reason to do that. gwen: how many states have done that? >> in terms of court action, six or seven. we have 17 states in which same sex marriage is allowed. we have a trial that starred t
religion isn't involved, these fights are all over land. so there has to be land c conflict. if the world came together, we mind need outside force. so that is probably not the answer you were looking for, but i don't know how else to put it. >> i have to apologize, i haven't read the book, but listening to your presentation, when you talk about the sioux, you mentioned the seven council fires and they divide up into three divisions, with the tee-time being one which has seven subdivisions and i hope you put that into book. and listening to you talk about the mutilation and the scalpings and it sounded line a common practice. bus this was something that was imposed upon them as well. [inaudible talk] >> i don't know what you mean by imposed upon. >> i mean exactly what you are saying -- >> the american indians were doing this to each other before they met others. >> anyways, the way you said it made it sound like we were the only ones doing it. and then also, it is great that you give credit to red cloud uniting the empire but there were other native leaders from many of the subdivision >
to the right. are they not? >> they my be. you know, i say forget making a movie about religion. they should make a movie about piracy. that's where hollywood as a big problem. they see eye to eye with conservatives. they respect private property, intellectual or otherwise. they realize it is critical to the economic growth. will is common ground. they a good thing between hollywood and conservatives. >> you look at the number of this hollywood par and are giving more money to republicans than democrats i don't see them as going right wing. in the movies businessmen always made convenient villains. it was true in "chinatown." it is true. it hasn't changed at all. >> is isn't will a change of direction here that you can sense? >> i don't sense that. i think rick is absolutely right. hollywood has always been about profits and i would throw into that that hollywood has been more conservative than people won't admit. taxi drivers, one of the great all-time film, very conservative message. even if you look at spike lee films, they often bring with hem conservative messages perhaps -- >> quick. >
is like joining a new religion. you have to learn entire new ways to act, talk, dress, think, an over the course of the three years they sort of morph. >> jon: and obviously the circumcision doesn't help. there's an incredibly interesting chapter where you stumble upon and you attend this incredible dinner called, it's not phi beta capa, it's a play on that. and it is all the kings of wall street in this very private affair, basically making fun of all those that they have destroyed during their career. it's a bizarre event. >> it's called the kappa beta phi an 80-year-old wall street secret society. it's made up of former heads much aig, goldman sachs, city group, anyone who is anyone on wall street is involved in this thing. they have an annual din wrer they take a bunch of neofeiths as the induckees are called, and mick them dress up in drag, perform skits and musical numbers. and a lot of those skits and musical numbers have to do with making jokes about the bailouts there was one song that they did that was a parody of abba's dancing queen that was called bailout king. >> jon: ba
under state law in arizona. race, gender and religion are but being gay is not. it wasn't protected before brewer vetoed the bill and it still isn't protected after the veto. the waiting photographer refused to fake pick kpurs of the gay couple and she was sued for it. the bill she vetoed was an effort to protect against the legal challenges that could result from discrimination. even with this bill gone there is no law on arizona's books that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation. at least 12 states this year has issued legislation like arizona to extend the tide. senator mike lee of utah, conservative republican has introduced the marriage and religious freedom act. as they scramble topaz these laws, though, the courts seem to be moving in the opposite direction, even when it comes to red state america. just this week a federal judge ordered officials in the state of kentucky to start recognizing the marriage of same-sex couples that were performed outside of the state. and in texas, federal judge struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the cur
of religion, that goes to the contraception mandate. they can spin this any way they want, it is really the catholic churches, right? and for example in boston they're no longer in the business and service and ministry of adoption, why? because if they don't send the children to gay couples they're out of it. and in washington, d.c., the same thing. that is a fundamental change in the way the united states of america operates as a country. >> we'll be right back after a break. we'll continue, coming up next tonight right here on hannity. >> not driven by any moral circumstances, it is driven by budget considerations. he would much rather spend the money on food stamps than he would on support for our troops. >> the vice president was not the only one to slam the decision to gut the america's military. we'll weigh in on the national security right after the break and much more on this special edition of "hannity." [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whethe
. this was not god's, this was caesar. this might have been freedom of religion on the part o of-- religious free done-- freedom on the part of this legislation but this came right down to arizona facing the same ignomiy and loss of capital that it faced on martin luther king day when it refused to accept martin luther king day as a national holiday and again lost convention business. i think it was a pretty tactical, hardheaded decision made. and mitt romney to his credit weighing in in favor of vetoing it. >> woodruff: along with arizona two senators it is not just arizona, but there are six other states considering similar legislation. >> well, i did declare my interest, hopefully we will see this resolve. what is interesting is the rea sortion of the corporate country club establishment that is what really rallied here and really changed the bill. this is an establishment that has been loss pog we are to the tea party, in part as my colleague gail pointed out because of the campaign-finance reform that made it hard for the big donors to control the party and made it easy for the tea party, bu
that there's even beyond literacy there was a sense that islam was a prophetic religion that had a strong ethos of solidarity and social justice that i think helped enslaved peoples survive in all sorts of ways. >> how conscious other than people like the traders and the viceroy, how conscious were sort of the people of the, the white people of the americas i guess who respect the people of the -- who aren't the people of the americas that they were muslims? was that part of the perception of it all or all the same that they just came from somewhere else and had their own -- >> i think it wasn't a problem until it became a problem, you know? if it was -- so in the largest urban slave rebellion in americas in history was led by, was -- had very strong participation by muslims in 1835. and that became very much part of the counterinsurgent response of, you know, islam as a problem. from the beginning, again, from nearly the first early uprisings and movements for resistance muslims often iewfed as a problem. -- identified as a problem. and spanish authorities were constantly issuing edicts
for a great presentation. my question is about your presentation, how does religion affects different styles? i am wondering if you talk to different diversity programs on those different campuses and how activism affects different things. >> in much the same way that we didn't find major differences in adoption among students who were fiscally conservative or socially conservative, we did see religious students and nonreligious students on each campus more or less adopted similar -- they fell into the style. that was typical of their campus, this was among women, this was in part because we studied women more carefully, we wrote a whole chapter on what we called conservative femininity. we doing is to -- interviews around the time, we were doing these interviews around the time that sarah palin was on the ticket so there is a lot of conversation about what it meant to be a conservative woman. really interested to come to understand to be a conservative woman is to be feminine, and to despise liberal feminism because liberal feminism is narrowing the opportunities for women and directing the
to get rid ofr race, religion, tribalism and melt them all down through a powerful centralized your accuracy and make them into a new soviet man. it collapsed because when against human nature. the imperative of the human nature. when it collapsed under the weight of human nature, there was no explosion of tribe and religion that is always under the surface. you will never rid the world of tribalism and ethnic identity. the same thing is happening now in america. we slowly lose our liberty as we have to have a powerful keepalized bureaucracy to the growing ethnic tensions in line. that is what is happening here. host: do you think there's anything that should be done right now in the ukraine? caller: no. let them do what they are going to do anyway. one thing i'd do is i admire putin because he is a nationalist. the russian people are dying out. he stopped international adoption and months to rescue his children with them. he is encouraging that through different things. i admire the guy. i wish i would have a leader like that. from john calling in pennsylvania this morning. the sen
religion if they didn't want to -- in particular if they didn't want to serve a customer. but the laws were not so specific as to say, well, you don't have to serve a gay person. they were just stating that you could cite religion as a reason not to do so in a court proceeding. now, whether or not they're a backlash to same-sex marriage, it's obvious the changes were proposed for that reason because that's what the legislators said that they were concerned about. i don't think it's going to do anything to stem the tide of support for same-sex marriage or for gay rights generally. >> adam, thank you. >>> up next, the "brain trust," spike lee, this is msnbc. suddee a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip and instantly open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicines alone. so you can breathe and sleep. shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe right. so you can breathe and sleep. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go. bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok
relationship with ukraine, good diplomatic and economic religions. >> john kerry, i assume he was, if he's in washington, he was at the white house for this so-called meeting. we saw general martin dempsey, chuck hagel, james clapper, where's kerry? >> he is, we don't know where he is right now, but clearly, he has a very close relationship with sergey la the russian foreign minister. you've seen some talk about the russians possibly calling their ambassador back to moscow, but that's not really where the business between the u.s. and russia is done. it's done between capitals, the white house, between the kremlin and secretary kerry and lavrov. secretary kerry has had some positive effects with his relationship with lavrov. they put together those peace talks in geneva. we have on the syrian crisis, we haven't seen a lot of progress, but they are determined to work together and this is i think you should look for kerry to get much more involved. >> we know the vice president, joe biden, has been deeply involved in this crisis as well. stand by. i want to go to moscow right now. fred is
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)